The revolution in plant-based eating

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(photo credit, Michael Piazza)

(photo credit, Michael Piazza)

In 1971, FRANCES MOORE LAPPÉ started a food revolution by promoting plant-based eating in her book, Diet for a Small Planet. 50 years later, her book has been updated — and that revolution has become a way of life for millions. Marty spoke with Frances Moore Lappé last week for a virtual Radio Times event. They talked about how plant-centered eating can help restore our damaged ecology, address the climate crisis, move us toward a healthier planet… and taste good, too.

Guest

Frances Moore Lappé, author and coauthor of more than 20 books including her first book, Diet for a Small Planet, The 50th anniversary edition is just out. She’s also cofounder of the Small Planet Institute. @fmlappé

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Earth Island Journal, Realizing Our Power: Farming and Eating for a Small Planet“By a broader measure, one in three people on Earth lack access to adequate food, reports the UN’s food policy arm. This suffering continues even as the world produces plenty of calories and a fifth more calories per person than when I first wrote Diet for a Small Planet.”

The Washington Post, ‘Diet for a Small Planet’ helped spark a food revolution. 50 years later, it’s evolving – “I’m not an optimist — I’m a possible-ist,” she says. “Everything is possible, we just have to make it happen.”

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