Gallup: Most blacks say they’re treated more harshly than whites

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People gather outside a Starbucks on 18th and Spruce streets in Philadelphia to protest Thursday's controversial arrests of two black men at the store. (Bastiaan Slabbers/for WHYY)

People gather outside a Starbucks on 18th and Spruce streets in Philadelphia to protest Thursday's controversial arrests of two black men at the store. (Bastiaan Slabbers/for WHYY)

NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller sits down for his weekly conversation with Gallup’s Frank Newport to talk about trends in U.S. opinion.

In the wake of national focus on the Starbucks incident in Rittenhouse Square, we can look back at Gallup data on perceived discrimination.

There is a big gulf between how blacks and whites look at the world. Two-thirds of blacks and 40 percent of whites say blacks are treated less fairly than whites by police; 52 percent of blacks say they are treated less fairly “in stores downtown or in the shopping mall,” and 17 percent of whites agree. About one-third of blacks say African-Americans are treated less fairly in their community “in restaurants, bars, theaters, or other entertainment places.” Fifteen percent of whites agree with that.

The Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington opens a new exhibit Monday on Americans and the Holocaust, looking at American public opinion in the late 1930s and 1940s as the Nazis were taking over.

The exhibit will feature Gallup polls at the time of the Holocaust showing that just two weeks after Nazi Germany coordinated a brutal nationwide attack against Jews within its own borders — known as “Kristallnacht” — 94 percent of Americans disapproved of the Nazi treatment of Jews in Germany.

At the same time, 72 percent of Americans said the U.S. should not allow a larger number of Jewish exiles from Germany into the country.

In fact, Americans have opposed letting refugees into the U.S. ever since.

Does President Donald Trump deserve re-election? About a third of registered voters at this point say he does, while 59 percent disagree. By contrast, in the spring of 2010, 46 percent said that Barack Obama deserved a second term.

Listen to the audio above to hear the full conversation.

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