Elif Shafak’s “Three Daughters of Eve”

Listen 35:30
** FILE ** Turkish author Elif Shafak is seen during an interview with The Associated Press in Istanbul, Turkey, in this Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2006 file photo.  A Turkish court on Thursday, Sept. 21, 2006, acquitted Elif Shafak, one of Turkey's leading authors, saying there was no evidence that she

** FILE ** Turkish author Elif Shafak is seen during an interview with The Associated Press in Istanbul, Turkey, in this Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2006 file photo. A Turkish court on Thursday, Sept. 21, 2006, acquitted Elif Shafak, one of Turkey's leading authors, saying there was no evidence that she "insulted Turkishness" in a novel. The decision is likely to appease the European Union which has warned Turkey putting writers and journalists on trial under repressive laws could hamper its efforts to join the bloc. (AP Photo/Osman Orsal/File)

ELIF SHAFAK is an award-winning Turkish novelist who writes about women’s and minority rights. In her new book, Three Daughters of Eve, Peri, a married, wealthy, beautiful Turkish woman, is on her way to a dinner party when a beggar snatches her purse. As she wrestles to get it back, a photo falls on the ground—an old Polaroid of three young women and their professor. This photo represents memories of a dark secret she wants to forget. In this hour, Marty talks with Shafak about her new novel and identity, feminism, faith in Turkey.

Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

It will take 126,000 members this year for great news and programs to thrive. Help us get to 100% of the goal.