International approval of American leadership declining everywhere — except Israel

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Head of the Mikdash Educational Center, Rabbi Mordecahi Persoss, holds a coin they minted bearing President Donald Trump's image to honor his recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital, in Tel Aviv, Israel, Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The center said Wednesday that the

Head of the Mikdash Educational Center, Rabbi Mordecahi Persoss, holds a coin they minted bearing President Donald Trump's image to honor his recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital, in Tel Aviv, Israel, Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The center said Wednesday that the "Temple Coin" features Trump alongside King Cyrus, who 2,500 years ago allowed Jews to return to Jerusalem from their exile in Babylon. (Sebastian Scheiner/AP Photo)

NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller sits down for his weekly conversation with Gallup’s Frank Newport to talk about trends in U.S. opinion.

Here are this week’s topics.

Gallup has new polling on American regard for other countries — the annual report again confirms that the public is most positive about English speaking countries Canada and Great Britain; European allies Germany and France; and Japan. Americans are most negative about North Korea, followed by Syria, Iran, and Afghanistan.

Americans are much more positive about other countries than those nations are about U.S. leadership. Israel is an exception to the noted disparity, which has grown more positive during the Trump administration.

In the aftermath of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School mass shooting that claimed the lives of 17 students and teachers, there is action on the part of high-profile retailers including Walmart and Dick’s Sporting Goods to increase the age to purchase a weapon to 21. There are also legislative proposals, including a bill from Republican U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania and Democratic U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia that updates a collaborative measure first offered following the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre. Through this, a divided nation speaks with one mind regarding the need for strengthening background checks for individuals who purchase guns.

To hear the full conversation listen to the audio above.

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