Are we doing severe weather alerts wrong?

Listen 13:01
A Doppler radar image from the National Weather Service in Mount Holly, N.J., shows a concentration of heavy rain and thunderstorms. (National Weather Service Doppler Radar Image)

A Doppler radar image from the National Weather Service in Mount Holly, N.J., shows a concentration of heavy rain and thunderstorms. (National Weather Service Doppler Radar Image)

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Dangerous weather watches and warnings are on the rise. The National Weather Service in Mt. Holly, New Jersey has issued 140 severe thunderstorm warnings in 2019 so far — more than triple the number from last year. Rachel Hogan Carr with the Nurture Nature Center in Easton explains why cellphones across the region keep lighting up with alerts, and why meteorologists and social scientists are rethinking the way they warn us about the weather.

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