An Iraqi Interpreter’s Story

Listen
Seated at the table, from left, Safa Ismael, state Rep. Brian Lentz and host Marty Moss-Coane, plus, standing, producers Patty Leswing and Susan Greenbaum.
Seated at the table, from left, Safa Ismael, state Rep. Brian Lentz and host Marty Moss-Coane, plus, standing, producers Patty Leswing and Susan Greenbaum.

Hour 2

American forces in Iraq and Afghanistan depend on Arabic translators.  However, being an Iraqi interpreter for the U.S. military is a dangerous job.  Dozens of translators have been killed by insurgents and many more targeted for their work with Americans.  Safa Ismael worked as a translator for the U.S. military in Mosul for two years, despite threats to his life.   After narrowly escaping a car bomb, Ismael decided he needed to leave Iraq.  With the help of some of the American soldiers he worked with, Safa Ismael was granted a special VISA for translators and came to Philadelphia where he now lives and works.  Today we’ll talk with Safa Ismael and two of the Americans who helped bring him here — State Representative Brian Lentz , who served in 416th Civil Affairs Battalion in Iraq and Lt Col Jeffrey Voice, a casulty assistance officer.

Listen to the mp3

Listen:
[audio: 072010_110630.mp3]

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