Viewer Alert

Due to the Senate impeachment trial, tonight's regularly scheduled TV programming will air on Y2.

Hundreds in Philly, tens of thousands across the nation rally to impeach Trump

Philadelphians descended on Thomas Paine Plaza to rally for the impeachment and removal of President Trump. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Philadelphians descended on Thomas Paine Plaza to rally for the impeachment and removal of President Trump. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Tens of thousands of people across the country marched in support of impeachment Tuesday evening, from a demonstration through a rainy Times Square to handfuls of activists standing vigil in small towns around the country.

Several hundred people gathered in near darkness outside Philadelphia City Hall, illuminated by protest signs spelling out “Impeach & Remove.” Protester Ruth Dubb of Bala Cynwyd is optimistic about the impeachment part, but not about removing President Trump.

“I honestly don’t think that the Senate is going to actually do anything so I don’t know if it will work, but I think it’s a way to get people motivated to vote him out,” Dubb said.

Alison Anderson from Center City came to rally on Thomas Paine Plaza to rally for the impeachment and removal of President Trump. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Tyrell Smith was disappointed that more people of color did not attend the Philly rally.

“I think that’s why it’s important for people like me to come out, I don’t have to work two or three jobs, I don’t have a large family to take care of,” Smith said.

Local Democrat speakers called for the impeachment and removal of President Trump on the eve of Congress’ impeachment vote. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Tangelo Logan held up a gay pride flag and said it’s time to remove Trump.

“Because he’s not doing what’s right for the people,” Logan said. “The people have spoken and we want him out and he’s got to go and that’s the bottom line.”

Carla Krash came from Narberth to rally on Thomas Paine Plaza to rally for the impeachment and removal of President Trump. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Liberal groups organized more than 600 rallies around the country. They followed a familiar model of mass protest that has come to define the left during the Trump administration. Some of the demonstrators were veterans of other marches, while others were like Glenn Conway of Holly Springs, North Carolina, who was attending his first political rally in 30 years,

“I really believe that the Constitution is under assault. That is not an exaggeration. I think we have a president at this point who believes he’s above the law,” Conway, 62 said.

Michael Ziegler, a Center City resident, came to rally on Thomas Paine Plaza to rally for the impeachment and removal of President Trump. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

For all the passion among activists, the gatherings were notably smaller than many of the other recent mass protests that began with the millions-strong Women’s Marches the day after Trump’s inaugural and have ranged over subjects from climate change to gun control.

In San Francisco, Marti McKee, a commercial artist, has been distributing signs and placards to marchers ever since Trump won the 2016 election. She has been struck by how impeachment draws so many fewer people to the streets than other causes.

“It’s upsetting, considering that we’re talking about corruption that affects our democracy,” she said. “I don’t understand why everyone isn’t out in the streets.”

Philadelphia City Councilperson Helen Gym calls for the impeachment of President Trump Tuesday on the eve of the impeachment vote in congress. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

In Denver, Thaddeus Bruno, 41, lamented that only a few hundred people had turned out. A friend attributed it to people being “Trump-sick,” or worn out by the controversies surrounding the president.

“Everyone gets Trump-sick,” Bruno said. “You take your tums and go to the next rally.”

Philadelphians descended on Thomas Paine Plaza in the freezing rain to rally for the impeachment and removal of President Trump. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Some activists acknowledge that impeachment doesn’t fire up people like life-and-death issues such as health care, guns or climate change. Recent public opinion polls show the country relatively divided over whether to remove Trump from office for pressuring Ukraine to investigate his political rivals, and the issue rarely comes up on the Democratic presidential campaign trail.

Jonah Minkoff-Zern of Public Citizen, one of the groups spearheading the demonstrations, cautioned against evaluating the impeachment marches purely on head count. He noted they were organized at the last-minute, on a weeknight, to coincide with the scheduled House vote on the two articles of impeachment Wednesday.

“This is a rapid-response mobilization,” he said.

Philadelphians descended on Thomas Paine Plaza to rally for the impeachment and removal of President Trump. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Some were cheered by the turnout in often bitter winter weather.

“All of us have to turn out for this one,” said Joelle Brouner, 46, a disability-rights activist who has cerebral palsy, said in front of the Colorado state capitol in Denver. “If we can’t take action in this particular circumstance, I question whether we will have the separation of powers we need to be a Republic.”

In New York, Tim Howard of Brooklyn said it was imperative to march and impeach. “We’ve got an unqualified foreign stooge in the White House with severe, severe doubt that he was even legitimately elected,” he said. “And it’s gone on too long and too far.”

Pa. Senator Larry Farnese calls for the impeachment of President Trump Tuesday on the eve of the impeachment vote in congress. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

In Raleigh, a white-bearded David Freeman, 68, wore a Santa hat while holding a sign that read “HO HO HO TRUMPY, MUST GO GO GO.”

“Activism is a long-term thing, and we need to smile and laugh and show people that we’re people like everybody else and we enjoy the seasons,” said Freeman, a retired research geophysicist. “We find joy in each other.”

Philadelphians descended on Thomas Paine Plaza in the freezing rain to rally for the impeachment and removal of President Trump. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Lee Churchill, 55, sat in a folding chair nearby, occasionally shouting out her support for the president. Though she wanted to show her pro-Trump position, she said the demonstration did not bother her.

“I think they have a right to speak out,” Churchill said.

Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

It will take 126,000 members this year for great news and programs to thrive. Help us get to 100% of the goal.