Why ‘Surviving R. Kelly’ has some black women feeling more included in #MeToo

Listen 13:51
#MuteRKelly supporters protest outside R. Kelly's studio, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019 in Chicago. Lifetime's

#MuteRKelly supporters protest outside R. Kelly's studio, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019 in Chicago. Lifetime's "Surviving R. Kelly" series which aired earlier this month, looks at the singer's history and allegations that he has sexually abused women and girls. Kelly, who turned 52 on Tuesday, has denied wrongdoing. (Ashlee Rezin/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

Many of the most visible victims to come forward in the #MeToo movement have been white women. Now, the new Lifetime docuseries “Surviving R. Kelly” is raising the voices of the victims of the singer’s alleged sexual misconduct, many of whom are African-American. So why is #MeToo, which was started by a black female activist, seen as excluding black women?  On this episode of The Why, we talk with Philadelphia Inquirer columnist Jenice Armstrong about why so many black women have felt left out of the movement and why that could be changing now.

Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

It will take 126,000 members this year for great news and programs to thrive. Help us get to 100% of the goal.