Forecast Calls for Dust

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This view of the north polar region of the Moon was obtained by NASA's Galileo's camera during the spacecraft's flyby of the Earth-Moon system on December 7 and 8, 1992.

This view of the north polar region of the Moon was obtained by NASA's Galileo's camera during the spacecraft's flyby of the Earth-Moon system on December 7 and 8, 1992.

Continue your lunation observations: The first quarter moon is on Wednesday Jan. 24. Here’s what to look for:

a. The line that separates the illuminated half from the not-so illuminated half is called the “terminator.”

b. Craters- the record of early solar system bombardment. The Moon absorbed a lot of what could’ve rained down on Earth.

Space material still rains down even on Earth – 100 tons of space dust every day, 36,500 tons per year. Sounds like a lot, right? Well, not so much… it’s a minuscule amount in relation to the Earth itself.

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