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Online learning resources you may have missed

The Notebook is collecting online learning resources that teachers and parents may not know about. We plan to update the list as we become aware of more worthwhile resources – with your help. (Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire)

The Notebook is collecting online learning resources that teachers and parents may not know about. We plan to update the list as we become aware of more worthwhile resources – with your help. (Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire)

This article originally appeared on The Notebook.

Updated Saturday, March 28

The Notebook is collecting online learning resources that teachers and parents may not know about. We plan to update the list as we become aware of more worthwhile resources – with your help.

Draw the Lines PA, devised by the Committee of Seventy, was designed as an online teaching tool about elections and gerrymandering. Since the coronavirus outbreak has closed schools, the Committee of Seventy has created a new activity packet for teachers and professors to make it easier to use. They are available for classroom Zoom sessions and are now hosting webinars for interested educators. Draw the Lines meets Pennsylvania’s new mandate for civics education.

The educational services organization Foundations Inc. has curated and vetted a series of online sites, broken down by area of study. There are links to virtual field trips, artists leading doodle sessions, and suggestions for physical activity, as well as more traditional sources of reading and math lessons.

This year is the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage. “Suff Buffs,” run by the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission, is providing educational materials to help commemorate the milestone – as are many other entities, including the Library of Congress,  Rutgers University, and the National Education Association. The fight for women’s suffrage is not told in much detail in most American history textbooks. For instance, did you know that women were arrested for holding peaceful protests in front of the White House (the Silent Sentinels) and force-fed in jail when they went on a hunger strike? While many of us have heard of Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, some suffragists in the later generation whose pressure led to the passage of the 19th Amendment have never become household names. Ever heard of Alice Paul? Ida B. Wells? Lucy Burns? Inez Mulholland? It is a great story. More resources at from The Alice Paul Institute  and a daily lessons for various ages on social media at #AlicePaulHomeschool. More resources at the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission and the 2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative.

Please send recommendations for additional resources to dalem@thenotebook.org or laurenw@thenotebook.org as you come across them. Include a short summary of how you used the resource and why it is worth sharing.

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