On ‘Radio Times’: Why China’s rebuke of N. Korea puts pressure on Trump

 South Korean army soldiers patrol along the barbed-wire fence in Paju, South Korea, near the border with North Korea, Monday, March 6, 2017. North Korea on Monday fired four banned ballistic missiles that flew about 1,000 kilometers (620 miles), with three of them landing in Japan's exclusive economic zone, South Korean and Japanese officials said, in an apparent reaction to huge military drills by Washington and Seoul that Pyongyang insists are an invasion rehearsal. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

South Korean army soldiers patrol along the barbed-wire fence in Paju, South Korea, near the border with North Korea, Monday, March 6, 2017. North Korea on Monday fired four banned ballistic missiles that flew about 1,000 kilometers (620 miles), with three of them landing in Japan's exclusive economic zone, South Korean and Japanese officials said, in an apparent reaction to huge military drills by Washington and Seoul that Pyongyang insists are an invasion rehearsal. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

North Korea and its leader, Kim Jong Un, have been engaging in military provocations to test America’s new President, and assess its place in the shifting world order.  

Radio Times’ Marty Moss-Coane was joined by Philip Yun Tuesday morning to discuss some of the intricacies of managing North Korea in light of their recent missile tests and a high-profile assassination of Kim’s half-brother. 

Marty asked Yun about how China can aide in deescalating Un’s incendiary activity. Yun pointed to China’s ban on coal from North Korea as being a good example of how the Chinese can work to punish the “Hermit Kingdom,” while leaving room for the U.S. to take action.

Listen to Tuesday’s full hour of Radio Times.

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