NJ lawmakers try to rally GOP support to override Christie veto on bridge agency changes

 New Jersey Sens. Bob Gordon and Loretta Weinberg say lawmakers will try again to override a Gov. Chris Christie veto, this time on measures for stronger regulation of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. (Phil Gregory/WHYY)

New Jersey Sens. Bob Gordon and Loretta Weinberg say lawmakers will try again to override a Gov. Chris Christie veto, this time on measures for stronger regulation of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. (Phil Gregory/WHYY)

Lawmakers in New Jersey and New York are attempting to override the gubernatorial vetoes of legislation aimed at improving the accountability and transparency of the Port Authority.

 

There’s never been enough Republican support to override any of Gov. Chris Christie’s vetoes over his five years in office.

But New Jersey Sen. Bob Gordon said this time is different because people care about the Port Authority’s impact on transportation facilities and tolls.

Gordon wants to meet with Senate Republican Leader Tom Kean to discuss rounding up the votes for an override.

“I’m going to suggest to him that if [his] members are concerned about retribution from the governor’s office, why don’t you all vote together as a bloc to give each other some cover,” said Gordon, D- Bergen.

One Senate Republican is committed to join Democrats in the planned override vote in March, said Gordon, who is hoping to get the two other votes needed for the effort to succeed.

He is appealing to GOP lawmakers who joined Democrats in unanimously voting for stricter regulation of an “out-of-control agency.”

“Last fall, they recognized a need for reform and voted with us to begin to bring this agency out of the dark ages,” Gordon said. “They owe it to their constituents and to the residents of the state to ensure that this is accomplished.”

New York lawmakers also plan to again pass legislation for the Port Authority reforms.

The agency has been criticized over the lane-closing scandal at the George Washington Bridge, allegations of conflicts of interest and the resignations of several top officials

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