The U.S. vs. supervised injection sites

Listen 49:00
Discarded syringes lay near near train tracks in Philadelphia, Monday, July 31, 2017. Workers are preparing to clean up the open-air heroin market that has thrived for decades along a set of train tracks a few miles outside the heart of Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Discarded syringes lay near near train tracks in Philadelphia, Monday, July 31, 2017. Workers are preparing to clean up the open-air heroin market that has thrived for decades along a set of train tracks a few miles outside the heart of Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Guests: Bobby Allyn, Ronda Goldfein, Beau Kilmer

Philadelphia was on track to become the first American city to have supervised injection sites, but these efforts hit their first major hurdle as the U.S. Attorney’s office filed a lawsuit against the non-profit at the forefront of implementing these facilities. The already-controversial program not only faces opposition from the federal government, but from community groups and anti-drug advocates as well. Still, many public health experts as well as high profile politicians like former Pennsylvania governor Ed Rendell and Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner champion safe injection sites as a means of curbing the overdose epidemic in the region. Today on the show, we’ll hear about the ins and outs of the lawsuit  with Keystone Crossroads’ BOBBY ALLYN. Then, we’ll talk with RONDA GOLDFEIN, who is the Vice President of Safehouse, the non-profit getting sued by the U.S. Attorney’s office. And we’ll also be joined by BEAU KILMER, a researcher with RAND who has looked at the pluses and minuses of supervised injection sites in countries where they are used.

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