The Buffalo shooting and the rise in violent extremism

Listen 49:00
Wayne Jones, holds his son Donell, while speaking during an interview with The Associated Press about his mother Celestine Chaney, who was killed in Saturday's shooting at a supermarket, in Buffalo, N.Y., Monday, May 16, 2022. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Wayne Jones, holds his son Donell, while speaking during an interview with The Associated Press about his mother Celestine Chaney, who was killed in Saturday's shooting at a supermarket, in Buffalo, N.Y., Monday, May 16, 2022. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

The 18-year-old white man who allegedly targeted and killed 10 Black Americans in a Buffalo grocery store on Sunday was motivated by white supremacist and violent extremist ideology and previous domestic terrorist attacks. The Buffalo suspect, Payton Gendron, posted a long hate-filled racist and antisemitic screed online with many similarities to other far-right terrorist attacks, including the New Zealand Christchurch massacre in which a gunman killed 50 people as they attended mosque. This hour, we’ll talk about this horrific mass shooting, why violent extremism appears to be on the rise, and how we can counter it.

Guests

Bishop Dwayne Royster, Executive Director of POWER, the largest faith based social justice organization in Pennsylvania. @ddroyster

Kurt Braddock, Assistant Professor in the School of Communication and faculty fellow at Polarization and Extremism Research and Innovation Lab (PERIL). His research focuses on the persuasive strategies used by violent extremist groups to recruit and radicalize.@kurtbraddock

Recommended reading

Mother Jones, Violent Far-Right Extremism Is Fueling Mass Shootings in America – The repugnant massacre in Buffalo also highlights the urgent need for greater attention on shooter warning signs.

The New York Times, A Fringe Conspiracy Theory, Fostered Online, Is Refashioned by the G.O.P. – Replacement theory, espoused by the suspect in the Buffalo massacre, has been embraced by some right-wing politicians and commentators.

NBC News, A community leader and a retired Buffalo officer are among victims killed in racist shooting at supermarket – “She would do anything for anyone,” Dawn Massey said of Katherine Massey. “Very family-oriented. She was the closest extension of our grandmother.”

WHYY is your source for fact-based, in-depth journalism and information. As a nonprofit organization, we rely on financial support from readers like you. Please give today.

Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

Together we can reach 100% of WHYY’s fiscal year goal