Challenge Alert

Lock in $15,000 with your donation by 6:30 p.m.

Donate now

Sentencing scheduled for man who orchestrated ‘Bridgegate’

 In this Sept. 23, 2016, file photo, David Wildstein arrives at Martin Luther King Jr. Federal Courthouse in Newark, N.J. Wildstein pleaded guilty last year to orchestrating traffic jams in 2013 to punish a Democratic mayor who didn't endorse Gov. Chris Christie. The former high-ranking official at the Port Authority who attended high school with Christie, testified that Christie was told about the traffic in Fort Lee on the third day of the gridlock during a Sept. 11 memorial event. (Julio Cortez/AP Photo, File)

In this Sept. 23, 2016, file photo, David Wildstein arrives at Martin Luther King Jr. Federal Courthouse in Newark, N.J. Wildstein pleaded guilty last year to orchestrating traffic jams in 2013 to punish a Democratic mayor who didn't endorse Gov. Chris Christie. The former high-ranking official at the Port Authority who attended high school with Christie, testified that Christie was told about the traffic in Fort Lee on the third day of the gridlock during a Sept. 11 memorial event. (Julio Cortez/AP Photo, File)

The man who admitted orchestrating a colossal traffic jam at the George Washington Bridge for political revenge is due to be sentenced.

Federal prosecutors in New Jersey say David Wildstein will learn his fate June 14.

The former Port Authority of New York and New Jersey official faces up to 27 months in prison. But prosecutors could seek less time due to his cooperation in the investigation of the long-running saga known as “Bridgegate.”

Wildstein testified against former Port Authority executive Bill Baroni and Bridget Kelly, a former deputy chief of staff for Republican Gov. Chris Christie. Both were convicted and recently sentenced to prison terms. Both are appealing.

Wildstein testified Baroni and Kelly were willing participants in the plot to punish a Democratic mayor who didn’t endorse Christie for re-election.

Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

It will take 126,000 members this year for great news and programs to thrive. Help us get to 100% of the goal.