On ‘Radio Times’: Blues artist Ruthie Foster credits her grandmother for her music

 Blues artist Ruthie Foster playing live at WHYY as Radio Times host Marty Moss-Coane listens in (Facebook Live)

Blues artist Ruthie Foster playing live at WHYY as Radio Times host Marty Moss-Coane listens in (Facebook Live)

Earlier this morning, Marty Moss-Coane talked to Foster about the poems her grandmother, affectionately known as “Big Mama,” made her recite to overcome her shyness and to help with her speech.

Three-time Grammy nominated blues artist Ruthie Foster said she wanted to slow down and get back to the basics when recording her new album Joy Comes Back. This 10 track collection features songs mostly written by other people like Mississippi John Hurt, Sean Staples, Grace Pettis, Black Sabbath, and Stevie Wonder, but combines her gospel, soul and blues roots.

She grew up in a small town in Gause, Texas.  Music was always played in her household. Her father loved blues and her mother loved to sing gospel. Foster said there was a rite of passage for family members to sing in the church choir on Sunday mornings. However, Foster was shy and had a stutter.

Earlier this morning, Marty Moss-Coane talked to Foster about the poems her grandmother, affectionately known as “Big Mama,” made her recite to overcome her shyness and to help with her speech.

“Big Mama would write these poems, and dig up poems for me to read in church during the morning services,” Foster said. “And most importantly, she taught me how to slow down with my speaking when I felt like I was just about to stumble all over myself. It was almost like the rhythm of a preacher.”

To hear more of the interview with Foster and her music, listen to Radio Times.

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