On ‘Radio Time:’ Venezuelan hunger fuels anti-Maduro protests

 In this April 19, 2017 photo, an anti-government protesters throws a molotov bomb at security forces in Caracas, Venezuela. Tens of thousands of opponents of President Nicolas Maduro flooded the streets of Caracas in what's been dubbed the 'mother of all marches' against the embattled socialist president. (Fernando Llano/AP Photo)

In this April 19, 2017 photo, an anti-government protesters throws a molotov bomb at security forces in Caracas, Venezuela. Tens of thousands of opponents of President Nicolas Maduro flooded the streets of Caracas in what's been dubbed the 'mother of all marches' against the embattled socialist president. (Fernando Llano/AP Photo)

Organizers have called it ‘the mother of all protests.’ Demonstrators took over the streets of Caracas, Venezuela on Wednesday to complain that the country’s president, Nicholas Maduro, has done nothing to ease the deteriorating economy and taken steps to shut down the opposition and his critics.  There are food shortages and a rising crime rate.

On Radio Times Friday, host Marty Moss-Coane was joined by Reuters reporter, Brian Ellsworth based in Caracas. 

When Marty asked if the people in Venezuela were literally starving, Ellsworth said “that term has been perhaps politicized, but it’s very, very clear that people are not eating the way that they used to.”  He went on to describe the lengths citizens are going to keep themselves fed including picking through the trash, skipping meals, and focusing on locally produced starches.

To hear more on Venezuela, listen to the full interview on Radio Times.

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