New Philly bill born from building collapse trial

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 A four-story building collapsed onto the nearby Salvation Army Thrift Store at 22nd and Market Streets on Wednesday, June 5, 2013.  (Lindsay Lazarski/WHYY)

A four-story building collapsed onto the nearby Salvation Army Thrift Store at 22nd and Market Streets on Wednesday, June 5, 2013. (Lindsay Lazarski/WHYY)

The deadly, 2013 Center City building collapse is spurring more legislation.  

The latest idea would put the onus on architects to speak up when they see a problem.

Just this week, demolition contractor Griffin Campbell was convicted of manslaughter for his role in the Center City building collapse.  Philadelphia City Councilman Curtis Jones says he was shocked to hear in testimony that when architects see an imminently dangerous building, they are not legally require to report it.

“Common sense would dictate if you see something you should say something, particularly when it would result in imminent danger to the public,” Jones said.  “So we are going to take a look at that to see if there is a private action that could be taken when people ignore that.”

Jones says he wants to attach a civil penalty for construction professionals who fail to notify the city of dangerous situations.

Jones has introduced a bill, a hearing has not yet been scheduled.

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