Challenge Alert

Lock in $15,000 with your donation by 6:30 p.m.

Donate now

    New Jersey voters reject majority of school budgets

    Residents turned down school budgets in 58 percent of the 541 districts where voting was held. Rejected budgets now go to local municipal officials for consideration.

    The majority of school budgets in New Jersey have been rejected by voters. But that’s not the end of the process.

    Residents turned down school budgets in 58 percent of the 541 districts where voting was held. Rejected budgets now go to local municipal officials for consideration.

    In the past many of those budgets underwent minor tweaking before being put in place.

    Republican Assemblyman Joe Malone believes it’ll be different this year.

    “I think they’re going to be trimmed significantly,” says Malone. “The local officials, I think, got a wakeup call that the public is outraged about the increases in taxes and that they want to take this situation into their own hands. Local officials who do not listen to the taxpayers are going to pay a dear price.”

    Governor Christie says the budget rejections may encourage more local teachers unions to re-open negotiations and accept a pay freeze to avoid program cuts and job losses.

    Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

    It will take 126,000 members this year for great news and programs to thrive. Help us get to 100% of the goal.