Lorenzo’s law helps Delaware parents of stillborn children

 Kim DiSalvo holds Lorenzo's law after it was signed by Gov. John Carney in his Wilmington office.(Dan Rosenthal/WHYY)

Kim DiSalvo holds Lorenzo's law after it was signed by Gov. John Carney in his Wilmington office.(Dan Rosenthal/WHYY)

Delaware mothers who give birth to stillborn babies get a new form of support thanks to “Lorenzo’s law” signed by Governor John Carney this week.

On July 3, 2016, Kim DiSalvo gave birth to her son, Lorenzo. She was just into her eighth month of pregnancy, and Lorenzo did not survive.

Under Delaware law, DiSalvo and her husband Chad were not able to get a birth certificate. “A year ago, I was sad, grieving, and I missed my son,” Kim said. “I thought the world was going to forget about him and I know I could never.”

DiSalvo successfully lobbied her legislators to make a change. “With a birth certificate, it’s the mark that signifies that there’s been life,” said state Sen. Nicole Poore, D-New Castle. “So today, when we sign this legislation it will be the mark that no child will be left forgotten.”

Earlier this week, Gov. John Carney signed the bill, now known as “Lorenzo’s law.” It allows parents of stillborn children to request a certificate of birth resulting in stillbirth.

“In the past month, two of my friends have had a stillborn baby, and because of Lorenzo’s law, they were able to get birth certificate, so no one will be able to forget our sleeping angels in the state of Delaware,” DiSalvo said.

The legislation was approved in June by unanimous votes in both chambers of the General Assembly.

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