In region, Lehigh Valley bears brunt of wintry storm

 This satellite image taken at 5:30 p.m. EST on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014, and released by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, shows a broad area of low pressure along the eastern seaboard of the United States. A sloppy mix of rain and snow rolled into the Northeast on Wednesday just as millions of Americans began the big Thanksgiving getaway, grounding hundreds of flights and turning highways hazardous along the congested Washington-to-Boston corridor. (AP Photo/NOAA)

This satellite image taken at 5:30 p.m. EST on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014, and released by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, shows a broad area of low pressure along the eastern seaboard of the United States. A sloppy mix of rain and snow rolled into the Northeast on Wednesday just as millions of Americans began the big Thanksgiving getaway, grounding hundreds of flights and turning highways hazardous along the congested Washington-to-Boston corridor. (AP Photo/NOAA)

The Northeast Corridor got an early taste of winter today as wet snow slicked roads from New York to D.C.

In Pennsylvania, travel in the Lehigh Valley was particularly treacherous. PennDOT spokesman Ron Young said, thankfully, there were only a few accidents.

“On Route 33, we had a passenger vehicle roll-over. On Interstate 78, we did have a jack-knifed tractor-trailer that cleared up relatively quickly. So there were some minor incidents that did occur but so far, for the most part, it’s been very good,” said Young.

He said drivers seemed to heed PennDOT’s call to wait out the storm’s worst before beginning holiday travels.

As temperatures begin to dip, the concern now is what will happen overnight and into Thursday when the temperature drops and wet roads become icy.

“Earlier in the morning, there could be some icy spots but once the sun comes out and traffic is moving around, there shouldn’t be any issues,” Young said. “Probably after 8, 9 o’clock in the morning, everything should be in real good shape.”

The Thanksgiving Day forecast is calling for cloudy skies with highs in the upper 30s.

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