Evaluating the chances of likely presidential contenders

    Listen
    Coffee mugs for sale with the images of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump sit side by side on a shelf of a souvenir stand in Washington

    Coffee mugs for sale with the images of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump sit side by side on a shelf of a souvenir stand in Washington

    NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller sits down for his weekly conversation with Gallup’s Frank Newport to talk about trends in U.S. opinion.
     
    The election is now essentially down to likely choices Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. The public sees both as having personality and character issues, and both get low ratings on their ability to inspire and to be visionary.   
     
    Clinton and Trump are seen about the same by men nationwide — both with unfavorables in the 57-60 percent range.  So Trump has no real advantage over Clinton among men.  Among women, Trump is regarded unfavorably by 70 percent while Clinton is seen unfavorably by 49 percent.  So Clinton does have an advantage over Trump among women.
     
    Women and Democrats seem less interested in the election so far than men and Republicans. It’s hard to imagine that this election will match the turnout or enthusiasm of 2008, unless usually hard-to-turn-out groups such as young people, Hispanics and blacks decide become motivated to fight Trump.
     

    Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

    It will take 126,000 members this year for great news and programs to thrive. Help us get to 100% of the goal.