Corporate influence on campaigns likely to increase

    The U.S. Supreme Court has dramatically eased restrictions on corporate spending in political campaigns. Here’s a look at some changes we could see in Pennsylvania.
    Unlike many states, Pennsylvania has no dollar limits on individual political contributions, but it has banned corporate contributions.

    The U.S. Supreme Court has dramatically eased restrictions on corporate spending in political campaigns. Here’s a look at some changes we could see in Pennsylvania.

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    Unlike many states, Pennsylvania has no dollar limits on individual political contributions, but it has banned corporate contributions.

    The Supreme Court ruling means corporations in Pennsylvania can now write unlimited corporate checks to their political committees, and directly fund independent campaigns to influence elections.

    Shira Goodman of Pennsylvanians for Modern Courts says more corporate money means noisier campaigns inundated with political ads.

    Goodman: The kinds of things you want to know about candidates isn’t what’s coming in on those one minute TV soundbites or those robo calls. You want to know really how is this person going to make decisions, are they ethical, are they fair, are they qualified, do they have a judicial temperament. I don’t think extra money coming in from corporations and unions is going to help people make better decisions in the ballot box.

    The Pennsylvania Chamber of Commerce disagrees, saying the ruling will encourage a broader exchange of ideas in politics.

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