Bringing the Mispillion back from the dead

    After two years the restoration project along Delaware’s Mispillion River is finally complete. Parts of the river have been transformed into vital habitat for local wildlife. WHYY’s Stella Payne takes a look the project.

    After two years the restoration project along Delaware’s Mispillion River is finally complete. Parts of the river have been transformed into vital habitat for local wildlife. WHYY’s Stella Payne takes a look the project.

    (Photo:Tim Kiser)

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    All along the Mispillion River you can see the clean up and restoration. The removal of invasive plants along the river has helped to provide habitat for local and migratory birds. The marsh was severely eroded because of boat wakes. Natural materials were use to protect the river banks.

    Organizers say the goal is to keep the land in its natural habitat, and reserve it for the future. Bill Pike owns land that was restored.

    Pike:
    “I’d like to see the rest of the river have the same thing done to it, yes because big parts of it are in bad or worse shape than this was to start with.”

    More information:

    The News Journal: Milford marsh uses new way to fight erosion

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