AAMP opens permanent exhibit

    The African-American Museum of Philadelphia is reopening after months of renovation with a high-tech exhibit of black Philadelphians from 1776 to 1876,

    The African-American Museum of Philadelphia is reopening after months of renovation. Half of the museum at 7th and Arch Streets is devoted to a high-tech exhibit of black Philadelphians from 1776 to 1876, that is open to the public for free this weekend. The exhibit is designed to complement nearby attractions on Independence Mall.
    Listen:

    [audio: 090618PCMuseum.mp3]

    Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield was an African-American opera singer in the 19th century. In an interactive video exhibit at the African-American Museum, an actress portraying Greenfield looks you straight in the eye and delivers a sample of what made her internationally famous.

    Everything about the permanent exhibit is interactive – it either moves, talks, or lights up to tell the story of prominent black figures in Philadelphia history. Museum president Ramona Riscoe-Benson says the exhibit is meant to work in concert with other tourist sites nearby.

    Riscoe-Benson: For people to understand how Washington’s household included enslaved Africans, and understand what the dynamics of that time, is important. …It ties in with Mother Bethel Church very well.

    The 1.5 million dollar exhibit is part of a 4.5 million dollar museum overhaul. This fall the museum will close again for construction work on the lobby.

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