The push for safe injection sites in Philadelphia

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FILE - This July 31, 2017, file photo shows discarded syringes in an open-air heroin market that has thrived for decades, slated for cleanup along train tracks a few miles outside the heart of Philadelphia. Philadelphia wants to become the first U.S. city to allow supervised drug injection sites as a way to combat the opioid epidemic, city officials announced Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018, saying they would seek outside operators to establish one or more safe injection sites. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

FILE - This July 31, 2017, file photo shows discarded syringes in an open-air heroin market that has thrived for decades, slated for cleanup along train tracks a few miles outside the heart of Philadelphia. Philadelphia wants to become the first U.S. city to allow supervised drug injection sites as a way to combat the opioid epidemic, city officials announced Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018, saying they would seek outside operators to establish one or more safe injection sites. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Guests: Dionne Butts, Mary Beth Appel, Christopher Moraff

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney and District Attorney Larry Krasner want to create the infrastructure for safe injection sites in Philadelphia. The Port Richmond and Kensington neighborhoods specifically have been where addicts have gone to get high, creating problems for the residents who have dealt with overdoses and needle strewn sidewalks. The community is divided over whether a supervised injection center would be an improvement.  Today on the show, our trio of guests will describe what’s at stake for the drug users and the neighborhood. Today on the show, our trio of guests will describe the conditions of the communities most affected by the opioid crisis and hear residents’ thoughts on the idea of safe injection sites. We’re joined by reporter CHRISTOPHER MORAFF, who has been covering the opioid epidemic in Philadelphia since 2013. And, we’ll speak with Pastor DIONNE BUTTS of Greater Restoration Worship Cathedral who is a drug and alcohol counselor in the area, as well as community resident MARY BETH APPEL who has been providing services as co-director for the free health clinic at House of Grace Catholic Worker.

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