How to prepare for risky summer travel

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Travelers wait at 30th Street Station ahead of Memorial Day weekend, Friday, May 27, 2022, in Philadelphia, Pa. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

Travelers wait at 30th Street Station ahead of Memorial Day weekend, Friday, May 27, 2022, in Philadelphia, Pa. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

Many Americans are making their long-delayed summer vacations finally happen, even with the staggering cost of gas, food and goods, steep hotel prices, airfare increases and an uptick in Covid-19 cases. Airports and hotels are packed, and experts predict a robust travel season. But cancelled flights caused by crew shortages, weather events, and overbooking left many travelers scrambling this holiday weekend, and for those venturing out internationally, a positive Covid-19 test is the worst possible scenario. What should you do if you get stuck in another country due to Coronavirus? And how can you be a more prepared traveler if your trip hits a snag at a moment’s notice? And, if you haven’t made summer trip plans yet, we’ll get some recommendations.

Guests

Dawn Gilbertson (@DawnGilbertson) is a travel columnist for The Wall Street Journal, and Pauline Frommer (@Frommers) is co-president at frommers.com and editorial director of Frommer’s Guidebooks

We Recommend

The Wall Street Journal The Worst-Case Scenario Guide to Summer Travel “With more Americans heading out on vacation and business trips in the coming weeks, the travel system will be put to the test—and so will we.”

Frommers.com Just How Much Have Travel Costs Risen? Shocking Stats on Summer Travel “One of the pandemic’s few silver linings was that it forced airlines, cruise lines, tour companies, and others in the travel industry to become more flexible with cancellation policies. As a result, it’s possible to book travel with less risk than before the pandemic.”

NPR Here’s why you might still want to wear masks on public transport “Wherever you go, pay attention to how many passengers there are, how close together they are, and how well the air is moving through the space. Understanding these differences can guide your own personal decisions about what risks you can and cannot afford to take.”

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