The Spectrum’s days as revenue generator are not over

    The owners of the Spectrum are continuing their piecemeal de-construction of the sports arena. An implosion of the complex on South Broad Street is scheduled for this fall. Until then the owners are selling off almost everything as memorabilia.
    It started with the seats, then pieces of the 76’ers basketball court, now the plexiglass walls of the Flyers hockey rink are available. Small sections are available, etched with names of the players who won the Stanley Cup in 1974 and 75.

    The owners of the Spectrum are continuing their piecemeal de-construction of the sports arena. An implosion of the complex on South Broad Street is scheduled for this fall. Until then the owners are selling off almost everything as memorabilia. WHYY’s Peter Crimmins reports.

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    It started with the seats, then pieces of the 76’ers basketball court, now the plexiglass walls of the Flyers hockey rink are available. Small sections are available, etched with names of the players who won the Stanley Cup in 1974 and 75.

    According to the arena’s website, soon the very bricks comprising the arena will be made available to sports fans.

    Fred Bower owns a sports memorabilia store in Haddonfield, New Jersey. He says he has not seen any of the Spectrum items on the open market yet.

    Bower: The real collectors buy it and keep it. After a few years – why did I buy it? It’s a giant piece of plexiglass! What am I going to do with it. Then they start calling around the get rid of it.

    So far no items from the Specturm building have appeared on eBay. Bowers says he is only now starting to get calls about seats salvaged from the Vet,  a stadium torn down six years ago.

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