Philly sizzles as temperatures rise into 90s

 A worker pauses in the midday sun for a cool drink of water ion Philadelphia. Temperatures rose well into the 90s Wednesday.(Kimberly Paynter/ WHYY)

A worker pauses in the midday sun for a cool drink of water ion Philadelphia. Temperatures rose well into the 90s Wednesday.(Kimberly Paynter/ WHYY)

Is it hot out? Yes, yes, it is.

Rhea Roane from Berlin, New Jersey, said Wednesday after working in an air-conditioned Center City office building, stepping outside into the afternoon heat felt comfortable to her.

 

Roane said she was caught off-guard a bit by the heat Tuesday.

“I didn’t have the air conditioners in the windows at home,” she said. “So it definitely was a little bit hot by the time I was home and I thought it was a little bit early — usually it’s about this hot about July, August, but I’m enjoying it now after coming out of 60 degrees!”

Roane said this while carrying a sweater she’d brought to shield herself from the icy office temps.

The heat led the Philadelphia School District to let students out early.

Public health officials are warning older people, those with chronic medical conditions, pregnant women and small children to be especially careful in the hot weather.

They’re asking everyone to be on the look out for the early warning signs of heat stress: including decreased energy, slight loss of appetite, faintness, light-headedness and nausea.

Joe McLaughlin from Delaware County said he has a simple plan to beat the heat.

“Just sitting in the air, basically. I like the summer,” he said.

To deal with today’s excessive heat and to avoid heat-related illness, officials advise avoiding working or playing in the sun, wearing lightweight clothing and drinking plenty of non-alcoholic liquids to avoid dehydration. Serious signs of heat stress include rapid heartbeat, throbbing headache, chest pain, mental confusion, vomiting, and difficulty breathing.

Officials say anyone who experiences these symptoms should seek immediate medical attention.

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