Philly issues citywide curfew; PPD to release 911 call, bodycam footage of Wallace killing

Protesters confront police during a march Tuesday, Oct. 27 in West Philadelphia.

Protesters confront police during a march Tuesday, Oct. 27 in West Philadelphia. Hundreds of demonstrators marched over the police killing of Walter Wallace. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

Updated at 5:25 p.m.

Philadelphia has announced a citywide curfew amid ongoing unrest over the police killing of Walter Wallace Jr.

The curfew went into effect Wednesday at 9 p.m. and will be in place through 6 a.m. Thursday.

Grocery stores, restaurants and pharmacies may, using their discretion, choose to operate only for delivery services later than 9 p.m., Mayor Jim Kenney said in a press release.

Businessowners are advised to implement “appropriate measures” to secure their facilities and protect onsite and delivery employees.

During an afternoon news conference called to discuss the Wallace shooting and the subsequent unrest, Mayor Jim Kenney signaled that more citywide curfews could be coming.

“We’ll assess everyday what happened the night before and decide if we need another one,” he said Kenney.

On Friday, National Guard soldiers will arrive to assist Philadelphia police, but also protect property and prevent looting. A second group will arrive on Saturday, said Philadelphia Fire Commissioner Adam Thiel.

It’s unclear how many soldiers will be on the ground each day or how long they will be in the city.

“We are doing extensive planning with them now to make sure that we’re doing this very carefully and very thoughtfully,” said Thiel, who also directs the Office of Emergency Management.

As police prepare for another night of protests and potential looting, the department continues to investigate Wallace’s death, which made national headlines and has West Philadelphia residents on edge for the second time this year.

Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said the department will be releasing the transcript and audio of the 911 call that brought officers to Wallace’s home on Monday, as well as footage from their body-worn cameras “in the near future.”

Outlaw said the materials would be released after the Wallace family has the opportunity to review them.

 

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