Philadelphia vaccinating more of its children

    Many children who growth up in Philadephia face challenges. Local health professionals say getting sick because they weren’t properly vaccinated shouldn’t be on the list. The C.D.C.’s National Immunization survey shows Philadelphia’s rate of coverage for the basic childhood series of vaccines is on the rise.

    Many children who grow up in Philadelphia face challenges. Local health professionals say getting sick because they weren’t properly vaccinated shouldn’t be on the list. The C.D.C.’s National Immunization survey shows Philadelphia’s rate of coverage for the basic childhood series of vaccines is on the rise: in 2002 it was 75 percent and by 2008 it had climbed up to almost 90 percent.

    Transcript:
    Language barriers, transportation issues, and financial problems are just a few reasons parents give for why their children aren’t vaccinated.

    A city contract sends workers from the Council of Spanish-Speaking Organizations to help children who aren’t up to date on their shots.

    Immunization program Director Ana Rijo says workers help get children vaccinated for everything from hepatitis and polio to measels and rhubella.

    Rijo: “We visit around 800 homes every month. We offer education, transportation, and we help to get low cost immunizations at the free health centers for those children who don’t have insurance.”

    Rijo says the city’s high vaccination numbers are proof the program’s working.

    Listen:
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    [audio: reports20090408vaccine.mp3]

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