Original Constitution documents on display

    On this day, two hundred and twenty-three years ago, the Constitutional Convention convened in Philadelphia to sign the country’s founding document. Several institutions are celebrating “Constitution Day.”

    On this day, two hundred and twenty-three years ago, the Constitutional Convention convened in Philadelphia to sign the country’s founding document. Several institutions are celebrating “Constitution Day.” The documents are still alive and well.

    “We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union…”

    Students from Constitution High School gathered at the National Constitution Center to recite the Constitution from memory. Then they had cake. But this national museum devoted to the famous document does not actually have any original copies.

    For that, history buffs had to go to the Philadelphia Historical Society at 13th and Locust Street, where, for one day only, 6 original manuscripts were on public display. The first hand-written notes toward the document and its subsequent drafts did not begin with “we the people of the United States,” but rather listed the people of all thirteen colonies.

    Helen Weary from Rosemont says seeing how the document took shape is thrilling.

    Weary: It names the individual states, and then it says, We the people at the end. That was exciting to see how they came together and became united.

    Archivists at the Historical Society say they cannot recall when the documents were ever shown together like this, in sequential order.

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