Updated: N.J.’s Supreme Court upholds Kyleigh’s Law

    Young drivers in New Jersey may soon learn whether they need to display red decals on their vehicle license plates.

     The state Supreme Court is due to issue a ruling today on whether “Kyleigh’s Law” violates privacy and leaves young motorists vulnerable to predators.

    Update, 12 p.m. The state’s high court has ruled to uphold Kyleigh’s Law, saying the decal does not violate federal privacy laws or laws against unreasonable search and seizure.

     Named for a New Jersey teenager who was killed in a 2006 crash, the measure is meant to aid police in enforcing restricted privileges for young drivers. It was upheld last year by a state appeals court.

    A report issued by the state attorney general last year stated only one incident was reported to police. A 17-year-old female whose vehicle had a red decal was stopped by a man in a dark car with flashing lights, impersonating a police officer.

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    %reldate(2012-08-06T06:05:00

       YOUNG DRIVERS ON BOARD

       NJ’s Supreme Court to make ruling on Kyleigh’s Law

       TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Young drivers in New Jersey may soon learn whether they need to display red decals on their vehicle license plates.

       The state Supreme Court is due to issue a ruling today on whether “Kyleigh’s Law” violates privacy and leaves young motorists vulnerable to predators.

       Named for a New Jersey teenager who was killed in a 2006 crash, the measure is meant to aid police in enforcing restricted privileges for young drivers. It was upheld last year by a state appeals court.

       A report issued by the state attorney general last year stated only one incident was reported to police. A 17-year-old female whose vehicle had a red decal was stopped by a man in a dark car with flashing lights, impersonating a police officer.

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