New Jersey’s doctors-in-training plan to leave the state

    A survey conducted by the New Jersey Council of Teaching Hospitals finds 68% of newly trained doctors plan to work outside the state after completing their residencies.

    An increasing number of new doctors say they’re planning to leave New Jersey after finishing their training.

    A survey conducted by the New Jersey Council of Teaching Hospitals finds 68% of newly trained doctors plan to work outside the state after completing their residencies.

    That’s up from 53% a year earlier.

    Council vice president Deborah Briggs says the Garden State has an unfriendly environment for new doctors planning to set up a practice.

    “We have the lowest Medicaid reimbursement rate in the nation,” says Briggs. “We have a very hostile medical malpractice environment. It’s very costly to set up a new business, a small business, which is what they are.”

    Briggs is concerned the departure of new doctors will lead to a shortage of primary care physicians in New Jersey which will increase the waiting time for patients. She’s hopeful the state will take action to improve the business climate and consider tax exemptions for new doctors to encourage them not to move away.

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