N.J. Parents, lawmakers seek repeal of teen-driving law

    Mandatory decals are intended to help police enforce restrictions on new drivers. Critics say those decals make young drivers a target for predators.

    Some lawmakers and parents are calling for the repeal of the New Jersey law requiring young drivers to put red decals on their license plates.

    The decal provision of Kyleigh’s Law is intended to help police enforce restrictions on new drivers that limit the hours they can drive and the number of passengers they can have. But critics say those decals make young drivers a target for predators.

    Linda Gianni of Andover says her 17-year-old daughter was followed after putting the decals on her car.

    “I will never forget the fear and panic on her face when she walked in the house,” says Gianni. “She was visibly shaken. Once she calmed down she said she did not want to have the tags on her car anymore.”

    Linda Mysantry of Oceanport says her daughter, also 17, was followed while driving home from work after putting the decals on her license plates.

    “In her distress she could have easily lost control of her car and gotten into a serious accident,” says Mysantry. “The person who followed her could have been a predator out to find a 17 year old girl. In fact they’re easy to stop these days because the state of New Jersey has branded them.”

    Since the law took effect in May only about half of the 250,000 drivers required to have those decals have purchased them.

    Assemblyman Robert Schroeder and Senator Tom Goodwin are calling for the legislature to act on a measure they’ve sponsored that would rescind the decal requirement.

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