More pets given to shelters in recession

    The recession is not just causing people to lose their jobs and homes, they’re also giving up their pets. The numbers of dogs and cats turned into local shelters continues to increase.

    The recession is not just causing people to lose their jobs and homes, they’re also giving up their pets. The numbers of dogs and cats turned into local shelters continues to increase.

    Listen:
    [audio: 090810spshelter.mp3]

    The summer tends to be a busy time for shelters. Kittens are born and few people think of adopting a new pet if they’re planning a vacation. At the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society no-kill animal shelter in old city, adoption supervisor Alison Lamont shows off a pitbull mix named Cookie, who wags her tail at the slightest bit of attention.

    Lamont: Could possibly be the sweetest dog ever, she would do well in a home with adults, with kids, loves everyone she’s met so far and she’s ready to go.

    The Pennsylvania SPCA, which runs the Philadelphia’s animal control, reports the number of pets dropped off at city shelters has been steadily increasing since 2008.

    Director Susan Cosby says shelters should be a last resort for anyone who can no longer care for their pets. But, she says, shelters should be the first option for those looking to adopt.

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