Guardian Angels meet Wilmington officials upon forming new chapter

 Guardian Angels representatives visited Wilmington, Delaware, police to talk about street patrols and other efforts to help fight crime in the city.

Guardian Angels representatives visited Wilmington, Delaware, police to talk about street patrols and other efforts to help fight crime in the city.

The Guardian Angels organization met with Wilmington City officials to discuss a new chapter.

 

Members of the organization, composed of volunteers committed to protecting their communities, met with Wilmington officials on Monday to discuss their efforts to tackle crime in the city.

On the tails of organizing a Wilmington chapter, the Guardian Angels met with Wilmington Police Chief Bobby Cummings and City Council President Theo Gregory. The formation is a response to the perceived growing crime and violence in Wilmington.

“When you go into new area or community they have their own notions of who the Guardian Angels are and what it is we do,” said Marcus “Strider” Dent, regional director for the organization.

“They’re both receptive of the Guardian Angels coming in, and I think the meeting today helped out because it took the wind out of their sails,” Dent added.

The group made up of Wilmington residents will patrol streets and form relationships with agencies and individuals to come up with ways to combat crime, such as education initiatives and youth outreach.

Gregory said he was “impressed” with the program, which he says is not looking for any resources or special authority permission from the City. He said there are several community groups in Wilmington that address the needs of its residents, but additional help is welcomed.

“I think the city can use any appropriate organizing that they can get to address the needs in the city,” Gregory said.  

The Wilmington branch is recruiting community members who will go through a three-month training period. The first graduating class is expected to finish training in December. Dent says until then Wilmington residents should expect to see trainees out on the street and talking to community members.

“Our long term goal is to get people involved, and to change the dynamics of what’s going on in Delaware,” he said.

“The community members are the ones that have to say, ‘Hey we want change.’ The community is the most important key to public safety,” Dent said. 

 

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