Exploring the musical and cultural legacy of Bill Graham

     Bill Graham at a family barbecue in Butano Canyon, Northern California, in 1972. (Photo courtesy of the National Museum of American Jewish History)

    Bill Graham at a family barbecue in Butano Canyon, Northern California, in 1972. (Photo courtesy of the National Museum of American Jewish History)

    “Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolution” at the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia immerses visitors in many of the signature sights and sounds of 1960s, ’70s and ’80s popular music. 

    To get a sense of the singular promoter who helped to bring the plays and players into prominence, NewsWorks Tonight’s Dave Heller spoke with Bill’s son Alex Graham and National Museum of American Jewish History curator Josh Perelman.

    Alex Graham recounted what he knew of his dad’s childhood.

    “When he was eight, 1939 roughly, it was not a good time to be a young Jewish kid in Berlin. He fled with the youngest of his five sisters, and they basically spent the next two years literally walking on foot across Europe.”

    The three also discuss how Bill Graham chose his name once he moved to New York, and why he decided to use the power of rock for social change.

    You can listen to the full conversation below.

     

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