Crews begin cleaning Camden Superfund site

    The Environmental Protection Agency is using $28 million in federal stimulus money to clean-up a sprawling New Jersey Superfund site that covers parts of Camden and Gloucester City.
    Today a crew took down a nondescript building, with a dangerous secret.

    The Environmental Protection Agency is using $28 million in federal stimulus money to clean-up a sprawling New Jersey Superfund site that covers parts of Camden and Gloucester City.
    Today a crew took down a nondescript building, with a dangerous secret.

    EPA officials and Camden leaders gathered to watch a crew knock down a low tan building that sits on radioactive soil.

    With the building down the EPA will be able to clean-up the dirt that’s contaminated with the radioactive element thorium.  Thorium was once used to make gas lamps glow brighter.

    Congressman Rob Andrews says the site could play a role in Camden’s revitalization.

    “This should be the next site where the first generation of hydrogen batteries, or parts of wind turbines, are researched and made and assembled and shipped.  Parts can come in through our port, they can be manufactured here, they can be serviced here, they can be delivered throughout our state and throughout our region.”

    The clean-up is expected to be complete by December.

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