Can children "recover" from autism?

    A small study at the University of Connecticut is big news for families affected by autism. The new research suggests that about 10-percent of children can recover from autism.

    A small study at the University of Connecticut is big news for families affected by autism. The new research suggests that about 10-percent of children can recover from autism.

    Listen:

    [audio:090512msautism.mp3]

    Researchers have previously suggested that recovery from autism is possible, but experts say this is the first time the phenomenon has been thoroughly documented.

    The University of Connecticut study continues, but scientists say that some children who were diagnosed with autism at an early age no longer show symptoms of the disorder, and were helped by years of intensive therapies.

    Michelle Rowe is director of Saint Joseph’s Kinney Autism Center. She says that while the findings are encouraging, many children do not respond well to treatment:

    Rowe: Some parents do whatever they can for their children, including therapy every waking hour of the day, but the child makes very little progress

    Rowe says while early intervention efforts are very important, there also have to be resources for older children who are not responding well to treatments.

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