Bats do it. Dolphins do it. Listen to this man ‘see’ the world with sound

     Austin Seraphin explains how echolocation helps him to navigate his world. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

    Austin Seraphin explains how echolocation helps him to navigate his world. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

    Austin Seraphin, 36, is a Philadelphia-based accessibility consultant, a volunteer museum docent and a computer programmer. He has been blind since birth — but now he can “see” with a technique known as echolocation.

    “By making a simple tongue click, I can actually see visual forms around me,” Seraphin says. “Seeing through sound, instead of seeing through light.”

    Get the full story from WHYY’s The Pulse.

    Echolocation is not yet widely used in the blind community. There’s only one group, World Access for the Blind, that teaches the technique.

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