‘Ghost forests’ proliferating along North American fresh water coastlines

Listen 9:44
This undated photo provided by Matthew Kirwan shows Phragmites and Spartina marshland expanding into a ghost forest in Robbins, Md. Rising sea levels are killing trees along vast swaths of the North American coast by inundating them in salt water. The dead trees in what used to be thriving freshwater coastal environments are called 'ghost forests' by researchers. (Matthew Kirwan via AP)

This undated photo provided by Matthew Kirwan shows Phragmites and Spartina marshland expanding into a ghost forest in Robbins, Md. Rising sea levels are killing trees along vast swaths of the North American coast by inundating them in salt water. The dead trees in what used to be thriving freshwater coastal environments are called 'ghost forests' by researchers. (Matthew Kirwan via AP)

Matthew Kirwan, professor at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science speaks with NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller.

Marshlands are proliferating where forests once stood along North American fresh water coastlines, creating so-called “ghost forests.”  And the conversion process appears to be accelerating.

Matthew Kirwan, professor at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science has been studying the trend.  He spoke with NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller.

Listen to their conversation above.

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