The Brood X cicada emergence

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An adult cicada is seen, in Washington, Thursday, May 6, 2021. Trillions of cicadas are about to emerge from 15 states in the U.S. East. The cicadas of Brood X, trillions of red-eyed bugs singing loud sci-fi sounding songs, can seem downright creepy. Especially since they come out from underground only ever 17 years.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

An adult cicada is seen, in Washington, Thursday, May 6, 2021. Trillions of cicadas are about to emerge from 15 states in the U.S. East. The cicadas of Brood X, trillions of red-eyed bugs singing loud sci-fi sounding songs, can seem downright creepy. Especially since they come out from underground only ever 17 years. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trillions of brood X cicadas will begin to emerge any day now as the soil warms up. They’ll tunnel out after 17 years of living and eating underground. For a few weeks, they’ll spend their time in the sun to mate, lay their eggs and die. Then this remarkable 17-year life cycle will begin all over again. Parts of Eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware are hotspots for Great Eastern Brood so this hour, we’ll talk about the Brood X emergence, where to see them and what to expect with Muhlenberg College entomologist MARTEN EDWARDS, who maps their distribution in Pennsylvania. We’ll also speak with DAVID ROTHENBERG about the incredible sound cicadas make and the music he makes with them. Biologist JENNA JARDIN also joins to talk about how eating cicadas and other insects can help with climate change. She wrote the Cicada-Licious cookbook after the 2004 emergence.

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