Social distancing and the limits of the law

Listen 49:12
Signs in the briefing room of the White House indicate social distancing measures being taken to separate reporters working at the White House, Monday, March 16, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Signs in the briefing room of the White House indicate social distancing measures being taken to separate reporters working at the White House, Monday, March 16, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Guests: Carolyn Cannuscio, Scott Burris

Public health and government officials are telling us to practice social distancing, keeping away from other people, particularly large crowds, to slow the spread of the COVID-19. But what precisely does that look like? Should we be in total isolation or is a walk outside with a friend or a dinner with another family okay? And what about for kids and their social lives? We’ll talk with University of Pennsylvania social epidemiologist CAROLYN CANNUSCIO about what we should and shouldn’t be doing, why it really matters, and how to stay mentally health when we’re more socially isolated. Pennsylvania Secretary of Health RACHEL LEVINE will then join us to give us an update on what steps are taking place at the state level to treat and limit the spread of coronavirus in the commonwealth. Lastly, , we examine the powers of the government during a pandemic? SCOTT BURRIS, director of the Center for Public Health Law Research at Temple Law School explains what authority federal and state officials have around quarantines, curfews, travel bans and more.

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