Regulating toxic “forever chemicals”

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PFAS are toxic chemicals commonly found in clothing and non-stick cookware like teflon. York County homeowner Nathan Volpi found out getting his water tested was neither easy nor cheap (Wallace McKelvey/PennLive)

PFAS are toxic chemicals commonly found in clothing and non-stick cookware like teflon. York County homeowner Nathan Volpi found out getting his water tested was neither easy nor cheap (Wallace McKelvey/PennLive)

The Biden administration is cracking down on use of PFAS, called “forever chemicals” because they don’t break down in the environment. The 4,000 or so per- and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals called PFAS are in all kinds of products, from nonstick cookware and makeup to stain-resistant furniture and firefighting foam. These toxic chemicals are in our water, our food, and our homes and are known to harm human health. They are linked to cancers, infertility, endocrine and immune problems, and high blood pressure and cholesterol. This hour, what and where are PFAS, the risk they pose and how to regulate them. We’re joined by CARLA NG, a chemical engineer and assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh, and SCOTT FABER, with at the Environmental Working Group.

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