‘Big Vape: The Incendiary Rise of Juul’

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In this Monday, June 17, 2019, file photo, Joshua Ni, 24, and Fritz Ramirez, 23, vape from electronic cigarettes in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Samantha Maldonado, File)

In this Monday, June 17, 2019, file photo, Joshua Ni, 24, and Fritz Ramirez, 23, vape from electronic cigarettes in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Samantha Maldonado, File)

During a smoke break, two Stanford University students dreamed up a small sleek device that could vaporize nicotine. That idea turned into Juul, an e-cigarette that resembles a flash drive and delivers 20 times more nicotine than a pack of cigarettes. Time Magazine health correspondent JAMIE DUCHARME charts the rise and fall of Juul in a new book, Big Vape: The Incendiary Rise of Juul. Ducharme explains that what started out as a business that could help people stop smoking cigarettes ended up embracing Big Tobacco tactics, marketing to teenagers and hooking them on vaping. Guest host Tracey Matisak talks with Ducharme about Juul’s missteps, teen vaping and the health effects of e-cigarettes.

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