The Historic Village of Allaire seeks funds to restore namesake’s house

     The centuries old Allaire house within the Historic Village of Allaire in Allaire State Park. The non-profit organization that manages and maintains the village is fundraising to restore the house. (Photo courtesy of Allaire Village, Inc.)

    The centuries old Allaire house within the Historic Village of Allaire in Allaire State Park. The non-profit organization that manages and maintains the village is fundraising to restore the house. (Photo courtesy of Allaire Village, Inc.)

    A non-profit educational and historic preservation organization is eager to restore an 18th century house in a state park but says it needs substantial monetary support. 

    Allaire Village, Inc., which manages the Historic Village of Allaire within Allaire State Park in Monmouth County, is fundraising to maintain and repair a house that was originally built in 1790 and expanded in 1822.

    The house, which was opened for tours in 1997, was expanded by James Peter Allaire, a prominent 19th Century marine engine manufacturer, and was on the grounds of the Howell Works Company, an iron producing community. The grounds are now a “living history” museum, portraying the everyday lives of people that lived there during the 19th century.

    But the structure has deteriorated since late the 1990s, an organization spokeswoman said in an email.

    “Since then, minimal maintenance and repairs have been done at the home, and it is severely battered by nearly two decades of weather,” said Kat Muller. “The exterior paint is peeling, water is leaking in through rotting doorjambs and window sills. Water damage caused peeling paint and plaster on the inside of the building.”

    The organization is responsible for managing and maintaining the historic buildings on the grounds, which is owned by the state. But according to Muller, the state has been unable to undertake repairs due to a lack of capital funds.

    A full restoration of the exterior costs approximately $25,000, the spokeswoman said, adding that it will cost “a lot more” to fix the interior — possibly at the same amount of the exterior.

    The organization has received a $2,500 grant from the the Monmouth County Historical Commission and is seeking public contributions via its “Village Giving Program” (click here) or GoFundMe (click here), Muller said.

    “The reason I am so passionate about Allaire Village is the human stories connected with it. We have over 150 volunteers who dedicate over 22,000 hours a year to our organization,” she said.

    “I really want to help their ‘Allaire home’ live up to its potential.”

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