Sum it up in six: In tribute to the treadmill

    The Philadelphia native who is largely responsible for bringing the treadmill to the masses, as a piece of routine exercise equipment, died last week Thursday. Give your tribute to the treadmill in six words or less.

    The Philadelphia native who is largely responsible for bringing the treadmill to the masses, as a piece of routine exercise equipment, died last week Thursday at his Clifton, N.J., home. William Staub was 96.

    Whatever your feelings for the now-ubiquitous treadmill, Staub is directly responsible for countless hours of misery — or elation. Agony — or success. That deserves a tribute.

    Love it? Hate it? Pay tribute to the treadmill in six words or less

    Examples:

    Now we’re all going nowhere fast.

    Get me off this crazy thing!

    The treadmill was originally used by doctors and fitness experts for stress tests. The equipment was expensive and impractical for the home. Staub, inspired by health and fitness pioneer Dr. Kenneth Cooper’s book “Aerobics,” wanted to build a commercially available version for people who wanted to run or walk, but for whatever reason couldn’t do so outside. Cooper encouraged him to go ahead with his plan.

    According to the Associated Press, his company, Aerobics Inc., sold his treadmill, the PaceMaster, until it folded in 2010.

    Sixes is inspired by SMITH Magazine.

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