School District of Philadelphia pushes healthier snacking

    The School District of Philadelphia is working to make cafeteria meals healthier for students. They’re taking a cue from a new law affecting chain restaurants.

    The School District of Philadelphia is working to make cafeteria meals healthier for students. They’re taking a cue from a new law affecting chain restaurants.

    The school district has stopped deep frying food and, just like in restaurants, is posting the number of calories in dishes.

    Wayne Gricessa is Senior Vice President of Food Services at the school district. He says they are putting in monitors instead of menu boards to give students more information and help them make healthy dining choices.

    “This year we discontinued use of our deep fat fryers,” says Gricessa, “so we substituted those products that we fried with oven-baked products. We are also sourcing a lot of whole grain products, reduced fat products. Breakfast breads, pastas, even our pizza is whole grain pizza flour.”

    The school district is also working to keep soda out of the schools. They only offer milk, 100-percent fruit juice and water for students. The district has the most restrictive snack policy in the country.

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