Pennsylvania AG office’s report on lewd emails won’t name names, will name some offices

    Special prosecutor Douglas Gansler is set to release his report Tuesday on the exchange of lewd and racist emails in  the Pennsylvania attorney general's office. (AP file photo)

    Special prosecutor Douglas Gansler is set to release his report Tuesday on the exchange of lewd and racist emails in the Pennsylvania attorney general's office. (AP file photo)

    For months, a certain report has been hanging over Pennsylvania’s attorney general’s office.

    The Gansler Report — or as many know it, simply “the porn report” — was ordered by former Attorney General Kathleen Kane in an effort to find out if pornography or other offensive material was being exchanged on government email servers.

    It’s finally set to be released Tuesday by interim Attorney General G Bruce Beemer.

    Kane contracted special prosecutor Douglas Gansler nearly a year ago, in the midst of the “Porngate” scandal, in which several top officials were found to have sent or received lewd emails.

    That scandal ultimately resulted in Kane’s own federal conviction for perjury.

    But the report didn’t go away — in fact, attorney general spokesman Chuck Ardo said so far, the office has paid Gansler’s firm, BuckleySandler, more than $385,000 with more invoices pending.

    He said its release is a long time coming.

    “I think this is probably the final chapter in the Kane odyssey,” he said.

    Ardo said the release was delayed because the office had to check all the emails flagged as inappropriate, to make sure no one was wrongly implicated.

    “There were multiple questions, not the least of which was whether the emails that were flagged were actually offensive,” he said.

    He said the final report won’t name names, though it’ll give “descriptions” of those found sending objectionable material.

    He explained that the specificity of those descriptions will vary. If a person is a member of the Supreme Court, for instance, the report will say so.

    Lower-level workers will generally be identified in vaguer terms.

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